Kanne Kalaimaane Review: This Udhayanidhi Stalin-Tamannaah-starrer is a well-intentioned story that never turns into a film

Seenu Ramasamy’s latest, Kanne Kalaimaane begins with an extended sequence of a village festival. The sequence ends with a man dressed as a king (he is in costume) accosted by his moneylenders. They inquire about the locked house and demand their money. Now, the scene could have ended there. But Seenu Ramaswamy wants to make sure we see the irony, and thus, one of the moneylenders asks who he is dressed as. The man replies he is ‘Karnan’ and the irony is spat out as dialogue before the sequence ends. This need to spell everything out makes Kanne Kalaimaane underwhelming – it exists as a series of dialogues but never really transforms into moving cinema.

Continue reading “Kanne Kalaimaane Review: This Udhayanidhi Stalin-Tamannaah-starrer is a well-intentioned story that never turns into a film”

Nimir movie review: This Udhayanidhi Stalin film is a faithful remake

The first few scenes of Maheshinte Prathikaram and Nimir are the same on paper. We are introduced to a pair of fairly used slippers that are being cleaned meticulously. While Mahesh (Fahadh Faasil who plays the lead in the original) just places it on the banks, a cinematic moment is created around Udhaynidhi. Selvam (Udhay) lifts the pair of slippers high above his head like a trophy in a gesture that feels close to triumph. After an unassuming introduction, Maheshinte Prathikaram gives us “Idukki” — a song that is vibrant and rich in culture. Here we get an equally flavoursome “Poovuku”, that showers us in nostalgia from the villages we used to see on screen in the 80s. However, the effect is a bit marred when the song is partly used as a dance number. Probably the most commercial trope ever, we have random women dancing around the fields with bare midriffs. Nimir is a fairly faithful remake that quite serves its purpose except for the times it plays to the gallery. Continue reading “Nimir movie review: This Udhayanidhi Stalin film is a faithful remake”

Ippadai Vellum movie review: This Udhayanidhi and Manjima starrer is a smart commercial movie

The first few minutes of Madhusudhanan (Udhayanidhi Stalin) on screen establishes what kind of hero he is. Running from his moneylenders, Madhu tactfully uses his surroundings to escape. While the graphic concept isn’t new, it is the situation that it has been used in that makes it interesting. Ippadai Vellum’s major strength is that it’s hero is feasibly larger than life. He is just how his introduction song describes him: “Aaradi Illa Aathiram Illa; Aayiram Yaanai Aatralum Illa; Thuninchavan Illa Bayanthavanum Illa; Aana Evanukkum Salachavan Illa. Thodra pakalam.” (I am not 6 ft tall, I don’t have the strength of 100 elephants, I might not be brave but I am not a coward as well. Touch me if you can.) I loved the sequence in the hotel where he gets the waiter into trouble for insulting his girlfriend Bhargavi (Manjima Mohan). The waiter asks if Bhargavi is waiting for her boyfriend to order as he would be footing the bill. Instead of creating a scene, Madhu slyly pays more than what he ordered for to the owner and says the waiter fudged the bill. It is Madhu’s smartness that makes him fascinating. Continue reading “Ippadai Vellum movie review: This Udhayanidhi and Manjima starrer is a smart commercial movie”

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